<

Don't Miss Out!

Sign-up to recieve updates on new posts along with special perks for Members. You will recieve exclusive access to the Member's Library where you will find a variety of freebies for every subject. Also, Members get a special monthly discount code for products in my store. Don't wait! Sign up today!

Math Lesson in the Life: Abeka Numbers Skills K5 Workbook

Written by Amber Marie | June 12, 2018

Math can be a tricky subject to teach a child and can be even harder if you don’t know where to start. As a former teacher, I had a wealth of knowledge with teaching math, but most of it was geared toward upper elementary. However, one thing I learned about early math skills was that BASIC NUMBER SENSE IS IMPORTANT. I cannot tell you how many third, fourth, or even sixth grade students I worked with in my years of teaching that had a weak understanding of basic number sense. Number sense, as defined by National Council of Teachers, is the understanding of five important components: number meaning, number relationships, number magnitude, operations involving numbers and referents for numbers and quantities. Through the experiences I had with different students, I learned the importance of a solid foundation in number sense concepts.

With my son technically being “kindergarten” age this year, I wanted to make sure I was building that strong foundation right from the start. In the beginning, I was piecing together my own curriculum here and there and it worked for a while, but I felt I needed more guidance. After talking with my mother-in-law (see her interview here), I learned more about Abeka, specifically the Numbers Skills K5 workbook. After flipping through her copy, I knew that I could make it work with my son and get more direction with my math focus for the year. So let’s take a look at a Math Lesson in the Life using the Abeka Number Skills K5 workbook.

What I Use

1. Workbook

As I mentioned, I am using the Abeka Number Skills K5 workbook. One thing to note is that this is just a student workbook and not a teacher’s manual. Abeka suggests purchasing the teacher manual with the workbook, however, I have opted to create my own lessons to pair with the pages found in the book. I’ll go into more detail on this later in the post.

According to Abeka, the Number Skills K5 workbook “provide practice and evaluation of many concepts, including numbers concepts from 1 through 100, numbers formation, number words, simple combinations, money, and telling time”. These concepts are reviewed in multi-faceted ways and expose the child to different approaches of learning the same concept. For example, with the skill of counting, a child may encounter a section where they must circle the correct number of objects based on a given number. The student will also see counting activities where they will be given a group of objects to count and must select the correct number. These methods, along with others, offer more experience with a specific math skill and prepares the child for real-world situations.

Another aspect I like about the workbook is how colorful and simple it is. There are only a few concepts being reviewed per page and the lessons are not overwhelming. There are no lesson numbers in the workbook (except for the ones found in the bottom corner, which correspond with the teacher manual) so I have numbered each page with a number. A lesson for my son consists of the front and back of a page. I have found the concepts reviewed on these pages are similar, which makes planning my mini-lessons easier. Which leads me to the next thing I use when teaching my son a math lesson: manipulatives.

2. Manipulatives

Manipulatives are physical objects that engage students in hands-on learning, specifically in math. If you’ve read my previous posts, you know I am a huge advocate for hands-on learning. I find it much easier to teach my son a math  concept when he is able to physically move or “manipulate” objects to make his learning more concrete. I was lucky enough to acquire a lot of my manipulatives from fellow homeschool moms whose children have outgrown the tools, however, I have listed my favorites below and provided links to the products if you wish to purchase them.

Counting Bears – I use these so often I really should buy more. These are great for teaching about patterns, counting, sorting, and more. Companies have come out with other animals, but for some reason I love the counting bears the best.

Number Tiles – These are actually part of a set that comes with a 3D hundreds chart and transparent color tiles. Check out my video for more on how I use these in a lesson.

Ten Frame Cards – I just made these using index cards and a ruler to draw 10 boxes. Ten frames are a great way to build your child’s understanding of place value and numbers that add up to ten in addition to numbers larger than ten.

The tools above are a few of my favorites, however I am always collected manipulatives as I come across new concepts I’m introducing to my son. Be sure to check out the other manipulatives I like to use below.

So how do I go about using these manipulatives in conjunction with the workbook? Let’s take a look at this very topic next.

How I Plan

When I plan a mini-lesson to pair with a lesson within the workbook, I first take a look at the concepts being taught on the page. Is it counting? Patterns? Money? Shapes? Whatever it is, I think about the best manipulatives and techniques I can use to teach the skill to my son. I take a look at my manipulatives I have available and brainstorm a few ways to introduce the concept to my son. I will write down what I feel will be the best method and collect the materials ahead of time so I’m prepared for the lesson when we get to it.

I realize that it can be hard to come up with these teaching techniques without some guidance. I have a bit of an advantage with my former teaching experience, so it is a bit easier for me to think this way. However, I don’t want you to feel lost or left in the dark, so check out my freebie at the bottom of this post. It includes the steps I take to plan a lesson, along with different techniques I use to teach a certain math concept and what I like to use to help create a hands-on experience for my son. But before downloading the freebie, check out how a typical lesson pans out by reading below.

A Typical Lesson

Our math lessons always begin with reviewing the numbers we are working on learning through repetition. Right now my son is practicing counting up to fifteen. He has mastered numbers one through ten, but still needs practice with numbers eleven to fifteen. Once I feel he has mastered those, we will add the next five numbers, and repeat this until we reach one hundred.

After reviewing our numbers, we move into the mini-lesson that gives my son a hands-on approach to the concepts we’ll be reviewing in the workbook.

One thing to note, I don’t normally include number formation in my mini-lesson and instead I address it when we come to it in the workbook. The mini-lesson lasts about five to eight minutes depending on the difficulty of the concept(s) being reviewed. I use a number of manipulatives and methods when teaching my son a new skill. I make sure to present the concept in more than one way to give him exposure to the different modes he may see the topic in the real-world.

After the mini-lesson we move into the workbook. One advantage of beginning with the mini-lesson is that my son already has a good grasp of what is concept is being reviewed in the workbook. This allows for him to complete the majority of it on his own with little instruction from me. With the exception of number formation practice, I’ll read the instructions for the section he is working on and he will complete the rest without my help. If a number formation section is present, we’ll take a minute to talk about how to form the number and practice on a whiteboard before hitting the practice in the book. Overall a lesson from start to finish takes about ten to fifteen minutes.

Math can be a tricky concept to teach, especially in those early elementary years. However, with a little guidance from a workbook, such as the Abeka Numbers Skills K5 workbook, along with simple, short mini-lessons, anyone can teach their child the important foundations of number sense.

Need more guidance with how to plan a mini-lesson? Download my planning guide by filling in the form below. If you are already a member, this freebie can be found in the Member’s Library. Make sure to use the most recent password from this week’s newsletter to login.

Download the Math Mini-lesson Planning Guide Now!

I share tips on how to teach certain math concepts and list a number of math manipulatives I use in my homeschool.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

Recent and Related Posts

Math Lesson in the Life: Abeka Numbers Skills K5 Workbook

Math Lesson in the Life: Abeka Numbers Skills K5 Workbook

Math can be a tricky subject to teach a child and can be even harder if you don’t know where to start. Take a look at what I have learned about teaching math to my kindergartner.
Read More
Reading Lesson in the Life: The Good and the Beautiful

Reading Lesson in the Life: The Good and the Beautiful

If you have chosen to homeschool your children, and they are under the age of six, I’m sure you may have experienced the same anxiety I have on a particular issue. How do I teach my child to read? However, that fear subsided when I searched the web and found all the wonderful curriculums out there for homeschoolers. Suddenly, I wasn’t afraid anymore. I did a lot of research and even tried a curriculum out before using the curriculum I’m using now.
Read More
Why I Switched Curriculums Mid Year

Why I Switched Curriculums Mid Year

There comes a time in almost every homeschooler’s life when they question the curriculum they are using with their children. That time arrived for me this year around February. If you read one of my earlier posts about the curriculum I chose to use this school year, you would know that I was loving All About Reading for my Language Arts program along with Living Education for Math. I also mentioned that I would be trying RightStart Math when I saved up and purchased the curriculum. Needless to say, as the title already indicates this, I completely changed everything. Check out my reasons why below and what curriculum I’m now using with my five-year old son.
Read More
5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
Read More
Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Spring is such a lovely time to get outside, go for a walk and simply enjoy being outside. It's good for the body, it's good for the mind and it's good for the soul.
Read More
Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

You create them, feel them, you transform them and invent some new species...Hours of fun for little fingers who like to manipulate and have an artistic touch. As a quiet activity or as a fun bounding time with mommy. Felt is one of my favorite material to use for creating educative activities for little ones
Read More
5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

I get a lot of funny looks when I say I homeschool my son. However, those facial expressions change quickly to surprise when I mention I am a former elementary school teacher. So many people ask me “why I would want to homeschool my kids rather than send them to public school” among other questions. Normally, I give a quick run down of some brief reasons then go on my merry way. But as I sat down to think about it more, I was able to flesh out 5 things I LOVE about homeschooling that I (or my son) would never be able to get in a public school setting.
Read More
The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

Spring time is a time of new beginnings, healing and growth. From reading the 'The Secret Garden' it is clear to me that F.H. Burnett understood the significant positive value to a child's mental, physical and educational health, when it comes to spending time outdoors with nature. This book is a calling to all parents and educators to let our children loose amongst the miracles of Spring and allow nature to nurture them just like it did for the three little children in this story.
Read More
We brought a Spring cooking class into our homeschool this week!

We brought a Spring cooking class into our homeschool this week!

My daughter and I were playing outside the other day.. We were having a blast and noticed we had TONS of dandelions in our yard.. What a bother those things are when they completely cover your yard! & they are almost impossible to get rid of. Dandelion So why not make lemonade out of lemons.. or rather dandelion jelly out of dandelion weeds? It is a very simple progress, but it does take about a full day!
Read More
Learning about Bulbs: Results and Conclusion

Learning about Bulbs: Results and Conclusion

About four weeks ago, my son and I did an experiment with bulbs (see more here). We dissected and talked about the different parts of a bulb. We then forced them to grow in glass vases. Needless to say I was very surprised how quickly the hyacinths grew and bloomed. From the day we “planted” them, it only took 7 days for them to get to full bloom! During this week long experiment, my son and I made observations about the bulbs growth along with others. There were some interesting discoveries that I came to analyze and took note of.
Read More

Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Instagram

What curriculum do you use with your children? If you use Abeka, how do you use it to teach your children math? Share in the comments below. 

COMMENTS

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This