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5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by Kristina Peterson about how getting outside helped her homeschool run smoothly. Check out her bio below and enjoy reading! Also make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

Written by Kristina Peterson | May 18, 2018

Kristina is a blogger, homeschool veteran, and proclaimed bibliophile. She has towed her sons to book stores where they wandered through the aisles collecting books to read with smiles on their faces. On her blog, Book Bound Boys, her hope is to help you create a love for literature in your home. In this guest post find out how spring brings life to your days with stories and fun activities.

Follow Her: Blog, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.



Play at the Beach

I am a California girl and while you might be thinking that it’s still to cold to play at the beach or maybe your thinking “I don’t live by a beach”, some of my best memories are spending time with my mom on the sandy shores of the west coast. She would be sitting on her beach chair with her thick romance novel in hand. You can do this too because there are beaches everywhere! Some beaches lay next to a lake or a channel. But rest assured, there is a sandy world near by.

Beach Reads:

The Whale Boy by Nicola Davies

Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss

Visit an Arboretum or Botanical Garden

When I was a little girl my dad loved to drive up to San Francisco. We visited the Conservatory of Flowers and walked the grounds. It was long, long time ago but I can still smell the fragrance of flowers. You can take the entire family and get inspired to fill your garden with flowers that would work in the place where you live.

Arboretums and Botanical Gardens

Plan Your Visit

Shop for Garden Flowers

We move a lot so having a garden hasn’t always been possible. At least not in a traditional sense. I have managed to maintain small container garden that I can move or won’t feel terrible if I have to say “goodbye” to my plants. These last two years we have lived in the same home which allowed me to do some gardening. My son started getting involved because I asked him to come with me to pick out seed packets and buy supplies. Since December I have been walking around the house talking about what he might want to plant. Just last week we finally made it to our local garden center. We walked around and took pictures of some of the flowers we thought might work in out shady yard. He ended up choosing two succulents. He had researched them on the internet. He has named them: Tom and Tim. A day that I will cherish.

Garden Reads:

Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce
The Little Gardner by Emily Hughs

A Picnic in a Park

I just had the best memory. When we lived Juneau, Alaska my friends and I gathered all our kids together and went to our new park (it recently burnt down) had a picnic, swung on the swings and just had fun talking and running around with the kids.

Everything Birds

All three of my boys were in the Boy Scouts. It was a great opportunity to discover where we live and learning about birds was my personal favorite. Having lived all over the U.S. there are some birds we were able to see like the Bald Eagle in Alaska, the Road Runner in New Mexico and the adorable Turkey Vulture right here in Pennsylvania. When I worked for the homeschool program in Alaska I had the local bird rescue group visit with the bird friend the hawk. The kids loved it! Then in Texas the local Audubon Society volunteers visited our homeschool group and shared with my nature class how to identify types of birds and recognize the birds sounds. What I used to think was an owl I was hearing was really a dove a.k.a. pigeon.

Bird Reads:

Trumpet of the Swan by E.B. White
Owl Babies by Martin Waddell

Geocaching

I have to admit, I have never gone geocaching before but I have friends that do and it sounds like fun or at least an excuse to get the kids out of the house. From what I understand it kind of like hide and seek. You can use your phone and get a geocaching app. Select the “geocach” you want to find and then you are given it’s coordinates to help you find it. You search for it, find it and sign a log book to document that you found it. You add this to the geocaching app and put it exactly where you found it. You can leave items in the geocaching box too. What a wonderful way to get out and learn about the place you live. My son has found two on our local hiking trails. I’m not sure that geocachers will find them because I don’t think he put them back exactly where he found them.

Geocaching Reads:

The Explorer by Katherine Rundell
The Wild Robot by Dr. Peter Brown

Now that the sun has finally won and you can enjoy spring before the heat of summer arrives you can get out make this spring filled with meaningful plans for a memorable time to look back on. Happy Spring!

Check out more of Kristina’s most popular posts below.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

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Read More
5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
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Products I Love

All About Learning Press
Free Resources
RightStart™ Math Lesson Books

How do you plan for your spring? Share in the comments below!

COMMENTS

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by Dana Hanley about the wonders of botany with poppy dolls. Check out her bio below and enjoy reading! Also make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Written by Dana Hanley | May 16, 2018

Dana Hanley writes at Life Led Homeschool (http://lifeledhomeschool.com)about taking a more relaxed approach to homeschooling which favors wisdom over knowledge, depth over breadth and joy over happiness. It hasn’t been an easy road. She lost a son in 2010 and has been working to recapture her vision for homeschooling after struggling through years of grief. As the Lord has slowly turned her mourning into joy, her heart has turned to sharing her journey to encourage other homeschool families whose hearts are struggling through the demands of homeschooling. You can also follow her on facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/LifeLedHomeschool/

Spring is such a lovely time to get outside, go for a walk and simply enjoy being outside. It’s good for the body, it’s good for the mind and it’s good for the soul.

It’s also a wonderful opportunity to teach your children about the world around them through observation and play. Simply making toys, crowns and wreaths from the objects they find teaches proper vocabulary when you use correct terminology. And then, while their attention is focused, it is so much easier to expand their minds and teach them the wonders of a tiny seed, a blooming flower or an acorn shell.

This is why I love this little project, borrowed from Madame de Genlis (1746 – 1830), a French writer and educator. She herself was entirely homeschooled in a noble, but impoverished, Burgundian family. Her harp and her wit earned her admiration in Paris, where she eventually served as governess to wealthy families. One of her students would even take the throne of France.

She led her charges on nature walks long before Charlotte Mason was even born, and introduced them to botany through play. She encouraged them to appreciate the vast diversity of plantlife through games and crafts, including making these dolls from poppy flowers. Unfortunately, I am yet to find poppies near where we live, but we have modified these directions to make similar dolls from tulips, daffodils and lillies.

The petite, fragile dolls do not last very long, but the lessons learned through the act of play last a life time. 

Directions for a Poppy Doll

Materials:

  • poppy
  • blades of grass

Pick a poppy with at least five inches of stem. Bend down the front and back petals and tie them in the middle with a blade of grass. This will make the waistline and the doll’s dress.Take the side petals and bend them down, rolling them carefully into arms. Tie them at each end with a blade of grass. (Field poppies have four petals, so you will use one petal for each arm. Garden poppies may have eight, so you will use four for the skirt and two for each arm).

The carpel, or seed pod, serves as your doll’s head. The stamens will form a collar.

(directions taken from Hidden Stories in Plants by Anne Pellowski)

Check out more of Dana’s most popular posts below.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

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If you have chosen to homeschool your children, and they are under the age of six, I’m sure you may have experienced the same anxiety I have on a particular issue. How do I teach my child to read? However, that fear subsided when I searched the web and found all the wonderful curriculums out there for homeschoolers. Suddenly, I wasn’t afraid anymore. I did a lot of research and even tried a curriculum out before using the curriculum I’m using now.
Read More
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Read More
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5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
Read More
Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Spring is such a lovely time to get outside, go for a walk and simply enjoy being outside. It's good for the body, it's good for the mind and it's good for the soul.
Read More
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Follow on Facebook

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How do you get outdoors to enrich your homeschool? Share in the comments below!

COMMENTS

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

 

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by Rachel Margallian about a fun flower study using felt flowers. Check out her bio below and enjoy reading! Also make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

Written by Rachel Margallian | May 14, 2018

Hi , I Am Rachel, I grew up in the French Alps, studied and taught music, traveled around a bit and taught in some schools and orphanages in Africa  and Ukraine . I settled down in Italy in beautiful Tuscany, with my awesome Italian husband. We have 3 wonderful  kids and I am homeschooling them, my boys are 9 and 8  and my girl is turning 5 soon. I want to give my kids a love for learning and a strong foundation in God’s word.  One year ago I started a blog, “Je joue,tu joues, nous apprenons”   (In English ” I play, you play , we learn”)  to share with other moms  educative material that I created for my kids, like readers,  grammar and Math games and activities in French and English. My favorite  teaching approach  is  games and stories.  I  also want to share my experiences with other moms in the hope that it can be an encouragement to them as well as to provide them with resources that can be  a blessing. My guest post will be about trading the worksheets for Math games that you can play outside in the spring sunshine. these ideas of games  can be  adapted to different levels and topics as you follow your curriculum or planned lessons. online and on the show!

Follow Her: BlogFacebook, and Pinterest

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commision if you click through and make a purchase. To read my full disclosure policy click here.

 

Spring Flowers,

Pretty flowers,

Soft Flowers,

Rainbow colored flowers,

Fairy Tale Flowers,

Exotic Flowers…

You create them, feel them, you transform them and invent some new species…

Hours of fun for little fingers who like to manipulate and have an artistic touch.

As a quiet activity or as a fun bounding time with mommy.

Felt is one of my favorite material to use for creating educative activities for little ones.

 

I like to manipulate it when I make the game, it’s soft, warm, easy to cut and work with, and doesn’t need much sawing. The result is beautiful without having to spend hours of work on it.

For kids it’s ideal to stimulate their 5 senses, we have the visual colors and shapes, the texture to feel and they can manipulate it over and over again developing their fine motor skills.

I’ll write soon a blog post about some more Ideas of Felt quiet activities, but today I want to share with you the pattern and picture cards for you to be able to create easily this Felt Flower activity.

My little girl liked this creating flowers so much that I also made some kits for her cousins for their birthdays and they were delighted.

Once the child is finished creating a few flowers, the activity is easy to put away, and to store on the activity shelf.

Kids can follow the picture cards , and then invent new types of flowers.

In the PDF file that you can download for free you will find 12 cards and one page of pattern to help you cut the felt shapes .

 

Felt Flowers

Quiet activity

Art and fine motor skills

What you will need :

  • Scissors
  • One sheet of red felt, one of yellow, one of purple, and 2 of green.
  • Cardstock paper or normal paper and a laminator.
  • A hole puncher and a little ring .

Instructions:

  • Print , cut and laminate the pages 2 to 7.
  • Make a hole in the corner to be able to put a little ring to hold the cards together
  • Print the pattern of page 8 to help you cut out the shapes in the felt. Keep one sheet of green for the background (it can ben a different green that the leaves)
  • Find a nice little box or pouch to put the activity inside.

Download the Felt Flower activity here :

Felt Flowers

Be on the lookout for the next quiet felt activity about insects that I will post soon on my blog: je joue,tu joues,nous apprenons (I play you play, we lean) , or subscribe to my blog to receive a notice when it is ready in English!

My little girl likes to mix the two activities also to add life to her imaginary garden!

Check out more of Rachel’s most popular posts below.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

Recent and Related Posts

How to Plan a Year-Round Homeschool Year

How to Plan a Year-Round Homeschool Year

Now that summer has hit, I couldn’t help but get excited for the upcoming school year. This past year I did a combination of Pre-K/Kindergarten curriculum for my five-year-old son. This upcoming school year will be his “official” kindergarten year. But where to start? How do you plan a school year, especially if you want to do a year-round schedule? This is where I went back to my experiences with planning as an elementary school teacher. The methods I share below are not exact steps I took as a teacher, but they are pretty darn close. And considering that I am a homeschooler now and no longer a public school teacher, I do have a bit more flexibility with my planning.
Read More
The Benefits of Gardening Tomatoes with your Children

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I love being outdoors, especially during the beautiful season of summer. Summer is a time to make so many great memories from family trips to the beach, hot days at the pool, and eating ice cream and popsicles. One memory I’m excited to share with my oldest son is gardening. Our family enjoys growing our own vegetables and have picked a few different veggies to grow this year in our garden. My son was ecstatic when he got to pick a plant for him and his brother. We did some looking but it didn’t take long for him to spot the pictures of cherry tomatoes attached to the pots of some nearby plants.
Read More
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Read More
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If you have chosen to homeschool your children, and they are under the age of six, I’m sure you may have experienced the same anxiety I have on a particular issue. How do I teach my child to read? However, that fear subsided when I searched the web and found all the wonderful curriculums out there for homeschoolers. Suddenly, I wasn’t afraid anymore. I did a lot of research and even tried a curriculum out before using the curriculum I’m using now.
Read More
Why I Switched Curriculums Mid Year

Why I Switched Curriculums Mid Year

There comes a time in almost every homeschooler’s life when they question the curriculum they are using with their children. That time arrived for me this year around February. If you read one of my earlier posts about the curriculum I chose to use this school year, you would know that I was loving All About Reading for my Language Arts program along with Living Education for Math. I also mentioned that I would be trying RightStart Math when I saved up and purchased the curriculum. Needless to say, as the title already indicates this, I completely changed everything. Check out my reasons why below and what curriculum I’m now using with my five-year old son.
Read More
5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
Read More
Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Spring is such a lovely time to get outside, go for a walk and simply enjoy being outside. It's good for the body, it's good for the mind and it's good for the soul.
Read More
Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

You create them, feel them, you transform them and invent some new species...Hours of fun for little fingers who like to manipulate and have an artistic touch. As a quiet activity or as a fun bounding time with mommy. Felt is one of my favorite material to use for creating educative activities for little ones
Read More
5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

I get a lot of funny looks when I say I homeschool my son. However, those facial expressions change quickly to surprise when I mention I am a former elementary school teacher. So many people ask me “why I would want to homeschool my kids rather than send them to public school” among other questions. Normally, I give a quick run down of some brief reasons then go on my merry way. But as I sat down to think about it more, I was able to flesh out 5 things I LOVE about homeschooling that I (or my son) would never be able to get in a public school setting.
Read More
The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

Spring time is a time of new beginnings, healing and growth. From reading the 'The Secret Garden' it is clear to me that F.H. Burnett understood the significant positive value to a child's mental, physical and educational health, when it comes to spending time outdoors with nature. This book is a calling to all parents and educators to let our children loose amongst the miracles of Spring and allow nature to nurture them just like it did for the three little children in this story.
Read More

Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Instagram

What other activities do you use to enhance your child’s learning about nature? Share in the comments below!

COMMENTS

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by Amber about using the Secret Garden to enhance your homeschool. Check out her bio below and enjoy reading! Also make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

Written by Mrs. Pursuits | May 11, 2018

My names Amber (aka Mrs Pursuits) and I am a homeschooling mum of two young boys. As the owner and author of OneHundredandOnePursuits.com I am passionate about lifelong education. I endeavour to share with you our families homeschool journey, what’s working, what’s not and everything in between. I built our website to serve as inspiration, support and guidance to other homeschooling parents, those who are undecided about home education and anyone else who is trying to cultivate a love of learning in their home environment. In this guest post I will be encouraging you to take your homeschool into the great outdoors this Spring season to observe nature’s finest wonders and boost your families educational growth  just like Mary, Dicken and Collin do in ‘The Secret Garden’ By Frances Burnett.

Follow Her: Blog and Facebook

Spring time is a time of new beginnings, healing and growth. From reading the ‘The Secret Garden’ it is clear to me that F.H. Burnett understood the significant positive value to a child’s mental, physical and educational health, when it comes to spending time outdoors with nature. This book is a calling to all parents and educators to let our children loose amongst the miracles of Spring and allow nature to nurture them just like it did for the three little children in this story.

Dicken spends his childhood free roaming the moors and interacting with wildlife, through which he has learned compassion, love and kindness and uses all that he observes to understand and make sense of the world. His enthusiasm, knowledge, positive spirit and playful nature lead to him being the greatest mentor for two other children who are overcoming challenges and learning to appreciate the world through new eyes – Mary and Colin.

The activities these three children get up to one Spring are inspiring for any homeschool family and there are lots of ideas and tips to take away and use in your own homeschool.

Starting with…

GETTING OUT SIDE IN ALL WEATHER RAIN OR SHINE

April often brings with it a lot of showery outbursts. Watching the rain fall upon the window pane and hearing the gentle pitter patter can be relaxing whilst being a great tool for helping children to calm down when cabin fever sets in.

Yet, better still throw on the water proofs and wellys, pull out the umbrellas and get outside. Let the kids jump in puddles and I challenge you to jump with them! A bit of water never heart anyone but teaching your children how to appreciate all the varieties of life rather than a select handful of good days is invaluable. Plus it really is fun. 

OBSERVE, OBSERVE, OBSERVE

Take Science studies outside and observe systems at work first hand. Discuss what you see, hear, smell and feel.

Which birds build their nests in which trees? Frog spawn in the pond? Let’s do a frog life cycle study. Shoots coming up through the soil what are they? Species identification guide needed. Give the children a list of things to spot. Get the children to lay under a tree and watch the cloud. What type of clouds are they? What shapes are they making? How fast are they moving and why?

Encourage your children to question what they see around them and help to discover the answers .

And then…

DISCUSS and SHARE

For months Mary, Dicken and Colin talked only of the secret garden and emerging spring upon the green moors. They spent hours discussing what they had found or expected to find as Spring unfolded. Colin shares books and pictures with the children that were given to him by his father. Together they study all the pictures and descriptions of local wildlife.

Dicken brings to the table his wealth of hands on experience with the creatures of the moors. He even brings his animal friends along with him and teaches the other children how to care for them. I mean what shouts spring louder than bottle feeding a baby lamb?

Mary shares her stories and experiences of growing up in India. She draws conclusions about the differences and similarities between the two different countries and the people who live there and open the boys eyes to a different style of life. Which brings me to my next tip…

GET TO KNOW YOUR COMMUNITY

Be it extended family or the neighbors on your street this is the perfect time for you and your children to connect and learn more about the lives of the people around you.

The three youth in this story have all grown up in different situations and environments and it is their diverse experiences that directs them to their delightful conclusions about the world around them.

Have your youth spend time in the great outdoors with their grandparents or other elders in the community learning skills and discussing affairs of the past.

Let your children play and work with your neighbours children. Each sharing their own experiences and little life stories allowing them to learn all about other family cultures, beliefs or histories too.

You may even choose to gather the entire family and enroll in a outdoor garden community project. Socialise, exchange experiences and give back.

BOOKS, BOOKS AND MORE BOOKS

Take a walk to your local library. Breath in the smells of the fresh Spring air and the scent of knowledge pouring out of the books lined up on the shelves.

Colin took refuge in his books during time he spent shut up in his bedroom. He has learnt almost everything he knows about the outdoors from them. He discovered botany, biology and scientific classification, global culture, history and natural environments, language and literature. I’d imagine although not explicitly mentioned in the story there were a great many other things he could have learnt from the pages of his books.

There are hundreds of books that bring Spring to life for children and adults a like. The Secret Garden is only one of many.

What books bring the joy and knowledge of Spring into your homeschool? Be sure to let us know in the comments below!

Check out more of Amber’s most popular posts below.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

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With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
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Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

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Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Instagram

Products I Love

All About Learning Press
Free Resources
RightStart™ Math Lesson Books

What books bring the joy and knowledge of Spring into your homeschool? Be sure to let us know in the comments below!

COMMENTS

We brought a Spring cooking class into our homeschool this week!

We brought a Spring cooking class into our homeschool this week!

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by Sarah from Sarah and Fam about how to make dandelion jelly. Check out her bio below and enjoy reading! Also make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

We brought a Spring cooking class into our homeschool this week!

Written by Sarah | May 9, 2018

My name is Sarah. I have a lifestyle blog. I have had a very rough past and am finally discovering the new me. I am here to share with you everything I am passionate, everything I am struggling with and everything in between! I hope you will join me in my ventures in life. I am a mother of four children Jeremy, Bentley, Willow & Lillia. Jeremy and Bentley passed away when they were three months old and Willow I lost to a late miscarriage. Lillia is my only earthly child and she is four years old! We still honor all of the babies in our own way and are still learning to cope without them although it has been years. We blog about our life, our schooling, our hobbies, and just share just about everything with you! Watch out for our how to bring spring into homeschooling blogs they will have some awesome freebies!

Follow Her: Blog

Hello Everyone! I am so glad to be back! How are you? I hope you had time to check out my first Blog in this series & I hope you enjoy this one!

My daughter and I were playing outside the other day.. We were having a blast and noticed we had TONS of dandelions in our yard.. What a bother those things are when they completely cover your yard! & they are almost impossible to get rid of.

Dandelion

So why not make lemonade out of lemons.. or rather dandelion jelly out of dandelion weeds? It is a very simple progress, but it does take about a full day!

“Dandelion Jelly”

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Fresh Dandelion tops only
  • 8 Cups water
  • 2-3 tablespoons of real lemon juice
  • 1 package of powdered fruit pectin
  • 4 cups sugar

Directions

  1. Pick fresh flowers out of your yard- Have the children help here; they can sort by size & count how many they have picked (pick more than you think you will need)
  2. Rinse the flowers very well. Then peel off the petals. You only want the yellow and white.. Little to no green.– This helps with fine motor skills
  3. Put the 4 cup dandelion tops and 8 cups water into a pot, bring to a boil, then let cool on counter or in the refrigerator overnight. You should end up with a darkish-yellow-tea.
  4. Strain the “tea” in a mesh strainer, squeeze out all the water you can. Then continue to run the “tea” through coffee filters or a cheesecloth until there are no longer any bits of anything in your “tea”. When you think it is enough, do it one more time
  5. You will need 3-3.5 cups of the “tea” if you are under 3 cups add a bit of water to your “tea”
  6. Add the cooled “tea”, pectin, and lemon juice into a pot, slowly bring to boil then add sugar and slowly bring back to a boil constantly stirring. Boil for about 3 minutes after everything is well mixed.

There are tons of things you can do with dandelions. I honestly never knew they had any other use then for pollinating.

(more…)

Learning about Bulbs: Results and Conclusion

Learning about Bulbs: Results and Conclusion

 

Welcome to my Spring Series called “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool”. Today’s post is by yours truly and what my son and I discovered during our bulb experiment. Make sure to check out other posts in this series and guest author bios by clicking on “Bringing Spring into your Homeschool” under Blog in the menu.

Learning about Bulbs: Results and Conclusion

Written by Amber Marie | May 7, 2018

About four weeks ago, my son and I did an experiment with bulbs (see more here). We dissected and talked about the different parts of a bulb. We then forced them to grow in glass vases. Needless to say I was very surprised how quickly the hyacinths grew and bloomed. From the day we “planted” them, it only took 7 days for them to get to full bloom! During this week long experiment, my son and I made observations about the bulbs growth along with others. There were some interesting discoveries that I came to analyze and took note of.

In a science experiment, one follows the scientific method. The scientific method abides by the steps of purpose, hypothesis, materials, procedure, results, and conclusion. In my previous post, I covered the purpose, hypothesis, materials and procedure. This week I’m sharing with you our results and four conclusions we found after completing the experiment.

Quick Blooms

Over the course of the week, my son and I observed the growth of three bulbs we had “planted” in vases to force grow. There were many interesting discoveries we made along the way. Every few days I would have my son sketch a picture of what he saw with the hyacinths’ growth. It was the cutest thing to see him wake every morning and race down the stairs to see how much they had grown. As I mentioned above, it only took a week for the hyacinths to grow and bloom. Our original hypothesis was two to three weeks and was based on the research we had done prior to our experiment.

I took this opportunity to ask my son questions about why he thought the flowers bloomed so quickly. We came to the conclusion that because we “planted” them when they already had roots and were sprouting, it must of sped up the process. In the future (this winter) we plan to try this experiment again starting from chilled bulbs. 

Day 1
Day 3
Day 5

Roots and Height

Another observations we made was about the size of each plant. In the beginning of the experiment we “planted” three bulbs in vases. All of them had already sprouted and were about the same height when we transferred them. However, over the week of growth and bloom, we observed a significant difference between the three plants. One was very small, one was of medium height, and the last was very tall.

At first this fact surprised us, until we began looking back at our photos of the experiment. When looking through the pictures, it is clear that one of the bulbs had very little roots left, one had a good amount, and the last had a lot of roots. The difference in the amount of roots was do to the process of removing the bulbs from the dirt and gently cleaning them before the transfer to the vase. What we concluded was that the bulb with very little roots was the smaller of the plants (this was confirmed because we could see the roots through the glass vase). The tallest plant was the bulb with the most roots. My son and I discussed this further by hypothesizing (for a future experiment) that if we start three bulbs in the vase before roots have grown, that they will all grow the same height. Guess we’ll find out this winter.

Oh Mr. Sun

Sun. An important ingredient for a growing plant. My son and I found out that even though we were forcing the bulbs indoors, the sun was a much needed part of each bulbs growth. When we first began our experiment, I kept the bulbs indoors near a window. It wasn’t until the third and fourth day that I put them out on our front porch for the day. It was incredible what the sun’s rays did for these bulbs in that short amount of time. All but one began to bloom and the last bloomed the very next day. Of course direct sunlight is always best for these types of flowers, but in the future when we attempt this experiment again, we’ll try having one bulb outdoors and one bulb indoors the entire time to see what differences each bulb displays.

Tallest bulb at full bloom (Day 7)

Water and the Bulb

The final observation we made related to the amount of water we placed in the vases. Originally we stuck with keeping the level of water below the base of the bulb, which was recommended by others who had attempted this same experiment. However, we felt the roots were drying out and could tell that parts of the flower were not getting water when we saw some browning on the leaves. After taking this into account, we decided to fill the water high enough to cover the base of the bulb. Unfortunately, with the way we used the river rocks and placed the bulbs in the vase, it was difficult to determine exactly where the base of the bulb was located. After a few days, an awful odor started coming from each vase. With further investigation we found that we had filled the water too high and it began to rot the bulbs. We tried to remedy the mistake by drying them out in the sun but the damage had been done and by day eight and nine the flowers began wilting and the plant began to die.

My son and I talked about how we could fix this dilemma the next time and came up with a few ideas. First, we used two different sized river rocks but we mixed them throughout the whole vase. Instead of mixing them all together, we will use the larger rocks on the bottom to allow more room for roots to grow. On top of the bigger river rocks we will place the bulb and then surround it with the smaller river rocks for support. Not only would this allow the roots to grow more through the gaps in the larger rocks, but it would give us a marker for how high to fill the vase with water. I’ll make sure to update this post when we do this experiment again in the fall/winter.

The results and conclusions of this experiment were very eye opening not only when learning about plants, but when learning about the importance of the scientific method. When conducting this experiment, I knew it was important to not only complete the early steps of the scientific process with my son, but to also visit the later steps of results and conclusions. This helped my son learn that not all experiments work out perfectly and we must learn from our mistakes to fix future experiment results. Kind of sounds like a great life lesson as well. Overall, both my son and I thoroughly enjoyed this experiment and can’t wait to test out our new theories the next time we visit the task of “forcing bulbs”.

Check out more about the beginning of our experiment by clicking the image below.

Amber Marie

Welcome to my homeschooling blog. I’m a former educator turned homeschool mom. Homeschooling is a relatively new adventure for our family. Click my picture to learn more about my story and why I homeschool my family.

Follow Me On

Recent and Related Posts

How to Plan a Year-Round Homeschool Year

How to Plan a Year-Round Homeschool Year

Now that summer has hit, I couldn’t help but get excited for the upcoming school year. This past year I did a combination of Pre-K/Kindergarten curriculum for my five-year-old son. This upcoming school year will be his “official” kindergarten year. But where to start? How do you plan a school year, especially if you want to do a year-round schedule? This is where I went back to my experiences with planning as an elementary school teacher. The methods I share below are not exact steps I took as a teacher, but they are pretty darn close. And considering that I am a homeschooler now and no longer a public school teacher, I do have a bit more flexibility with my planning.
Read More
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I love being outdoors, especially during the beautiful season of summer. Summer is a time to make so many great memories from family trips to the beach, hot days at the pool, and eating ice cream and popsicles. One memory I’m excited to share with my oldest son is gardening. Our family enjoys growing our own vegetables and have picked a few different veggies to grow this year in our garden. My son was ecstatic when he got to pick a plant for him and his brother. We did some looking but it didn’t take long for him to spot the pictures of cherry tomatoes attached to the pots of some nearby plants.
Read More
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Read More
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If you have chosen to homeschool your children, and they are under the age of six, I’m sure you may have experienced the same anxiety I have on a particular issue. How do I teach my child to read? However, that fear subsided when I searched the web and found all the wonderful curriculums out there for homeschoolers. Suddenly, I wasn’t afraid anymore. I did a lot of research and even tried a curriculum out before using the curriculum I’m using now.
Read More
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There comes a time in almost every homeschooler’s life when they question the curriculum they are using with their children. That time arrived for me this year around February. If you read one of my earlier posts about the curriculum I chose to use this school year, you would know that I was loving All About Reading for my Language Arts program along with Living Education for Math. I also mentioned that I would be trying RightStart Math when I saved up and purchased the curriculum. Needless to say, as the title already indicates this, I completely changed everything. Check out my reasons why below and what curriculum I’m now using with my five-year old son.
Read More
5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

5 Meaningful Ways to Plan Your Spring

With just a short time left until summer you want to make the last stretch of the spring season count. Since we are short on time I have made a list of that has 5 ways to plan your spring using books and activities that will make this season memorable. It will bring a smile on your face every time you can look back on the memories that you created with your children. A meaningful spring will yield a great education.
Read More
Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Discover the Wonders of Botany through Play

Spring is such a lovely time to get outside, go for a walk and simply enjoy being outside. It's good for the body, it's good for the mind and it's good for the soul.
Read More
Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

Felt Flowers Quiet Activity

You create them, feel them, you transform them and invent some new species...Hours of fun for little fingers who like to manipulate and have an artistic touch. As a quiet activity or as a fun bounding time with mommy. Felt is one of my favorite material to use for creating educative activities for little ones
Read More
5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

5 Things I Love About Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling (Shared by a Former Teacher)

I get a lot of funny looks when I say I homeschool my son. However, those facial expressions change quickly to surprise when I mention I am a former elementary school teacher. So many people ask me “why I would want to homeschool my kids rather than send them to public school” among other questions. Normally, I give a quick run down of some brief reasons then go on my merry way. But as I sat down to think about it more, I was able to flesh out 5 things I LOVE about homeschooling that I (or my son) would never be able to get in a public school setting.
Read More
The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

The Secret Garden’ BY F. H. Burnett – The Ultimate Homeschoolers Guide To Spring

Spring time is a time of new beginnings, healing and growth. From reading the 'The Secret Garden' it is clear to me that F.H. Burnett understood the significant positive value to a child's mental, physical and educational health, when it comes to spending time outdoors with nature. This book is a calling to all parents and educators to let our children loose amongst the miracles of Spring and allow nature to nurture them just like it did for the three little children in this story.
Read More

Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Instagram

Products I Love

All About Learning Press
Free Resources
RightStart™ Math Lesson Books

Have you ever followed through with an experiment to find that the results were not what you thought? Share in the comments below.

COMMENTS

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